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What is the coldest NFL game in history?  

By SI Wire
December 18, 2016

Sunday's game at Soldier Field is a cold one.

The Bears have reportedly been keeping track of their game-day weather reports since 1963, and the coldest game on record was a Dec. 22, 2008 contest against the Packers when it was 2°F at kickoff.

Sunday’s game, also against the Packers, could break that record. The forecast calls for a temperature of 3°F at kickoff. 

Back in January, the Minnesota Vikings and Seattle Seahawks played in temperatures that were -6°F for the third-coldest game in history. The coldest on record is the the 1967 NFL championship game, also known as the Ice Bowl, is the coldest game in the history of the NFL. The temperature in Green Bay when the Packers and Cowboys kicked off was 13-below.

Here are some of the coldest games in NFL history:

• "The Ice Bowl", Green Bay Packers vs. Dallas Cowboys: Dec. 31, 1967 at Lambeau Field

Temperature: -13 degrees / Wind chill: - 48 degrees

• AFC Championship Game, Cincinnati Bengals vs. San Diego Chargers: Jan. 10, 1982 at Riverfront Stadium

Temperature: -9 degrees / Wind chill: -59 degrees

• AFC Playoffs, Buffalo Bills vs. Los Angeles Rams: Jan. 15, 1994 at Ralph Wilson Stadium  

Temperature: 0 degrees / Wind chill: -32 degrees

• Minnesota Vikings vs. Chicago Bears: Dec. 3, 1972 at Metropolitan Stadium

Temperature: -2 degrees / Wind chill: -26 degrees

• NFC Championship Game, Green Bay Packers vs. New York Giants: Jan. 20, 2008 at Lambeau Field

Temperature: -4 degrees / Wind chill: -24 degrees

• Minnesota Vikings vs.Green Bay Packers: Dec. 10, 1972 at Metropolitan Stadium

Temperature: 0 degrees / Wind chill: -18 degrees

• AFC divisional playoff, Cleveland Browns vs. Oakland Raiders: Jan. 4, 1981 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium

Temperature: -5 degrees

• Green Bay Packers vs. Los Angeles Raiders: Dec. 26, 1993 at Lambeau Field

Temperature: 0 degrees

• Green Bay Packers vs. Detroit Lions: Dec. 22, 1990 at Lambeau Field

Temperature: Two degrees

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