Tony Romo started playing in the NFL in 2004, but he didn't make the Super Bowl in his 14-year playing career. He's calling the game this year for CBS. 

By Khadrice Rollins
February 03, 2019

Former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo retired after the 2016 season following a 14-year playing career.

An undrafted free agent out of Eastern Illinois, Romo signed with the Cowboys in 2003. He didn't play in his first year, but he appeared in 22 games over the next two seasons while he was the team's backup quarterback, but he did not throw a pass until 2006.

He earned a Pro Bowl nod that season, and then again in 2007 when he guided the team to a 13-3 record an a NFC East division title. He earned two more Pro Bowl spots during his career in 2009 and 2014.

In 2010, Romo fractured his left clavicle and missed the majority of the season. He suffered a similar injury in 2015, which also left him out for the majority of that season, and opened the door for his eventual replacement to take the starting job the next season.

The Cowboys drafted Dak Prescott in 2016 in the third round, but due to Romo's health and Prescott's potential, he took over under center and has been the starter for every game since he came into the league.

Romo played one game in his final season with the Cowboys before hanging it up. He retired with 34,183 passing yards and 248 touchdowns along with 117 interceptions on a 65.3% completion rate. He is the franchise leader in yards and touchdowns.

After one year away from football, Romo joined the CBS broadcasting crew prior to the 2017 season and has quickly become one of the best announcers in all of sports. He'll call Super Bowl LIII between the Rams and Patriots on CBS. 

You May Like

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)