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The Capitals learned last year how a seemingly small trade can make a big difference, and they are among the teams that made low-risk moves at last month's trade deadline in hopes of reaping a high reward.

By Associated Press
March 06, 2019

Nick Jensen was just a Minnesota boy who played his first three seasons in Detroit.

Then he walked into the Washington Capitals' locker room and saw the likes of Alex Ovechkin, Nicklas Backstrom and Evgeny Kuznetsov, who welcomed their newest defenseman with open arms.

''I never knew them before this and I just see them on TV, and it's a little star-striking right away,'' Jensen said.

Jensen isn't a star, but he and winger Carl Hagelin sure fit the mold of low key trade-deadline acquisitions who can pay big dividends during a long playoff run. The Capitals learned last year in getting defenseman Michal Kempny how a seemingly small trade can make a big difference, and the defending Stanley Cup champions are among the teams that made low-risk moves at last month's trade deadline in hopes of reaping a high reward.

Vegas paid a big price to land winger Mark Stone, Winnipeg gave up its first-rounder for center Kevin Hayes and both teams are better for those pickups. Yet recent history shows contenders who tinkered rather than making a splash at the deadline got it right.

''To bring in people that are going to take major roles from some of your core guys, it starts to create some issues,'' Washington coach Todd Reirden said. ''Any time you have a chance to improve your players and acquire depth and give them a better opportunity to win, you don't ever pass it up. But it's something that seems like it's been a successful one for us last year with a little bit of an under the radar acquisition and then this year the same thing.''

Before the 2018 Capitals, the 2016 Penguins got Hagelin and defenseman Justin Schultz before the deadline, and a year later added Ron Hainsey and Mark Streit for blue line depth and repeated as champions even without Kris Letang. The 2015 Blackhawks similarly added forwards Antoine Vermette and Andrew Desjardins and defenseman Kimmo Timonen before winning their third championship in six seasons.

While Columbus went all in to get forwards Matt Duchene and Ryan Dzingel even with Artemi Panarin and Sergei Bobrovsky set to be free agents, other playoff teams tweaked to fill existing holes. Nashville paid reasonable prices to upgrade up front with Wayne Simmonds and Mikael Granlund. Winnipeg made perhaps its most important pickup with unheralded defenseman Nathan Beaulieu and Pittsburgh responded to injuries by trading for defensemen Erik Gudbranson and Chris Wideman.

''We feel like we picked up some good pieces,'' Predators coach Peter Laviolette said. ''But for the most part, this is the group that we've got to get on the page and get going in the right direction.''

Perhaps one reason minor deadline moves have as big an impact as substantial ones is there's only a quarter of a season for players to get acclimated to their new teammates. It's an ongoing process of watching video, studying and adjusting and it all happens on the fly in the midst of valuable games.

''You have to make an impact pretty quickly,'' Gudbranson said. ''Just play my game, be physical, make the simple play, be solid and just communicate quite a bit.''

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