Michigan State University failed to turn over documents that outlined accusations of sexual assault by Larry Nassar.

By Chris Chavez
January 25, 2018

Michigan State University failed to turn over documents that outlined accusations of sexual assault by former USA gymnastics and university doctor Larry Nassar to federal Title IX investigators despite another ongoing investigation by campus police, ESPN's Outside The Lines reports.

On Tuesday, Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for abusing young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment for nearly two decades. After days of pressure and criticism from the public, Michigan State University president Lou Anna Simon resigned.

The investigation by Outside The Lines also found that Michigan State administrators still have not provided federal officials all documents related to the Nassar allegations.

In 2014, a Michigan State graduate reported that Nassar abused her while treating her for an injury so an investigation by Michigan State campus police and Title IX investigators was launched. Federal investigators were not told of the Nassar allegations at the time, according to OTL. The Office for Civil Rights determined Michigan State fostered a "sexually hostile environment" on campus. Under a 2015 agreement to settle the findings, Michigan State administrators mandated that the university provide the Office for Civil Rights notification and documentation of all prior complaints of sexual assault and harassment by January 2016 but they did not meet the deadline. Michigan State administrators turned over documents almost a year later but reports against Nassar were not included.

What's Next From A Legal Standpoint Now That Larry Nassar Has Been Sentenced?

In Dec. 2016, an attorney with Michigan State general counsel's office informed the federal officials of "unfortunate oversight" that the accusations against Nassar were not included. By this point, Nassar had been fired from Michigan State. The attorney apologized and stated that the missing file may have been due to a staff transition within the Michigan State Title IX office.

10 months after acknowledging the mistake and oversight, OTL reports that an attorney with the Office for Civil Rights asked Michigan State about the missing files because nothing addition had been provided.

University spokesman responded to OTL's findings with a statement that read: "MSU is committed to taking the right actions to create a culture that provides a safe environment for all of its students."

Nassar will soon be sentenced for three other counts of criminal sexual conduct in an Eaton County, Michigan court.

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