By 90Min
October 31, 2017

Germany has become the latest country to be hit by the growing anti-semitic football problem after stickers of Anne Frank wearing a Schalke shirt were handed out.

The Sun showed images of the German-born Jew kitted out in the white and blue jersey of the Gelsenkirchen-based club as vile German football fans took inspiration from Lazio's ultras division following last week's much-criticised anti-Jewish stance.

It is unknown just which rival football supporters are behind this latest attack, but it is certain that Germany's authorities - both football and police - will investigate the incident as soon as possible.

Schalke has plenty of rival teams in and around its district, with the likes of Borussia Dortmund, Gladbach and Cologne all in neighbouring counties.

Regardless of which fans are responsible for this heinous act, it has no place in football and the relevant authorities will definitely come down hard on whoever is responsible.

Anti-semitism carries extremely harsh punishments in Germany in light of the atrocities carried out by the Nazis in World War II, with Anne Frank among those rounded up as Hitler's army committed mass genocide of Jews in the early 1940s.

Mario Carlini / Iguana Press/GettyImages

Just last week Lazio were heavily criticised after a small section of its fanbase distributed stickers at Stadio Olimpico depicting Frank in the shirt of bitter city rivals Roma.

Despite snippets from Frank's diary being ready out at matches across Serie A, the club stating its desire to send fans to Auschwitz to educate them over the issue and Lazio's players wearing t-shirts with "No to anti-semitism" on them, some Italian football fans continued to defy the authorities.

Lazio supporters sung "Me ne frego" - "I don't care" - a well fascist song and made Nazi salutes just hours after their side's match with Bologna.

Meanwhile, Juventus and ironically Roma fans also got caught up in the row, with small swathes of supporters opting to chant through the readings and turn their backs on the customary minute's silence held for victims of the Holocaust.

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