By 90Min
November 06, 2017

Get the mini-fridge out, dust off the bunting, prepare for the disappointment...the 2018 World Cup is but seven months away.

The remaining teams at the finals in Russia will be decided this month as playoffs take place around the world. However, for those already secure in their place in at least the group stage, preparations are already underway, starting with one of the most highly-anticipated staples of any major tournament: new kits!

adidas have now officially unveiled, and made available for sale, the gear several nations will be sporting next June. Here's a look...


Germany

Image by Andrew Headspeath

The reigning champions have been given a sleek update on the famous shirt that was worn during West Germany's World Cup triumph in 1990.

The retro look, which is pure hipster porn, comes complete with geometric motif across the chest, a gold World Cup winner badge (show offs) and a special collar design which apparently pays tribute to the link between this shirt and the one from Italia 1990.

Rating: 8/10


Russia

The hosts apparel also takes inspiration from an old favourite - the 1988 Olympic Winning kit of the Soviet Union.


The design is a simple red, with white shoulder detail and the neck features the Russian flag, an eagle and the motto "victory bound as one".

Rating: 5/10


Argentina

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Lionel Messi + 22 have a kit that commemorates the Argentine FA's 125-year anniversary and the 1991 Copa America victory.

The design is fairly standard issue for the Albiceleste, but the subtly blended blue and white stripes give it a unique element, while also making it look like it's constantly being viewed through some Instagram filter. 

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Rating: 7.5/10


Mexico

Another with a distinctly 90s vibe, Mexico's kit is intended to bring back the memories of the decade.

The light green striped block graphics running down the side and front of the shirt offer style which adidas describes as 'the perfect transition from the stadium to the street'.

It's a neat looking kit, even if legendary keeper Jorge Campos might have added a bit more flair.

Rating: 7/10


Belgium

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Euro 84 is the inspiration for Belgium's outfit for next summer.

Belgium didn't exactly have a tournament to remember and Enzo Schifo and the like failed to make it out of their group, while losing 5-0 to Michel Platini's France.

However their kit, which was one part golf jumper, two parts Scandinavian detective wear, became something of a favourite.

The new design is less garish but still features the diamond pattern in the country's flag colours. 

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Rating: 3/10


Japan

Already a firm hipster favourite for their obscure talent, Japan have gone all out to catch the eyes of football kit perverts across the globe.

In Russia, Makoto Hasebe's team will don a dark blue kit with a detailed pattern that resembles an empty motorway from above, only much more attractive.

The style is apparently based on traditional Japanese stitching techniques, while key moments in the country's footballing history are celebrated on the back of the neck.

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Rating: 8/10


Spain

La Roja's effort is inspired by (yup, you guessed it) the 90s. 1994 to be precise, with the edition worn by the likes of Fernando Hierro, Pep Guardiola and Luis Enrique at the World Cup in the USA celebrated here.

The classic red shirt is off-set by a sure to be divisive gold and purple diamond pattern running the length of the right hand side from the shoulder to the hem. adidas say "the diamonds represent the speed, energy and style of football that's become so associated with the national team."

Image by Andrew Headspeath

It just about works for Alvaro Morata, but the man could probably make that Belgium shirt look good.

Rating: 7/10


Colombia

Image by Andrew Headspeath

It seems almost impossible to make a bad Colombia shirt, and this 1990 World Cup-inspired design is no exception.


The jazzy blue and red graphic design on the side of the strip, contrasts well with the yellow, while the adidas piping and logo remain in black.

Hopefully the reference to the 90s will not be lost on the players, who will presumably all be sporting Carlos Valderrama style haircuts.

Image by Andrew Headspeath

Rating: 9/10

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