N.Y. State Senator Proposes Bill to Pay College Athletes Directly

A New York state senator has proposed a bill that would make the state the first to require colleges to pay student-athletes directly. 
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A New York state senator has proposed a bill that would make the state the first to require colleges to pay student-athletes directly. 

Sen. Kevin Parker proposed Senate Bill S6722A earlier this week that "allows student-athletes to receive compensation including for the use of a student's name, image or likeness; allows student-athletes to seek professional representation; requires colleges to establish an injured athlete fund to provide compensation to athletes for career-ending or long-term injuries."

Parker also added an amendment that would require college athletic departments to give a 15% share of annual revenue to student-athletes, which would be divided equally.

"It's about equity," Parker told ESPN. "These young people are adding their skill, talent and labor to these universities. ... You don't need the shortcuts and the end-arounds because now we're providing some real support for these student-athletes."

He told ESPN he modeled the initial proposal on California's Fair Pay to Play Act, which passed the state's assembly and senate unanimously this month. The bill is now headed to the California governor to be signed or vetoed within the next month. California schools and the NCAA have opposed the bill, which would make it impossible for schools to follow the NCAA's amateurism rules. The bill would allow college athletes to be paid for the use of their name, likeness and image. 

The California bill would not force schools to pay athletes, but rather allow athletes to hire agents who can procure business and sponsorship deals.