After a slew of pitcher injuries, the Mets are shaking up their staff. 

By Dan Gartland
October 03, 2017

Two of the Mets’ longest tenured staff members have been fired, the team announced Tuesday

Head trainer Ray Ramirez, who had been with the team since 2005, and Dan Warthen, the pitching coach since 2008, are both gone.

Mike Puma of the New York Post reported last week that Ramirez’s job was safe because, despite a rash of injuries to the team’s top players, he “remains well-respected by the team’s top officials, who deem the criticism unwarranted.”

The Mets, who went from preseason Wild Card favorites to near the bottom of the National League, were affected more by injuries than any other MLB team this year, according to Roster Resource’s calculations. Yoenis Cespedes landed on the DL twice with hamstring injuries, Noah Syndergaard pitched just 30 1/3 innings after tearing a lat muscle in April, and Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler missed time with stress reactions, just to name a few. 

Warthen’s dismissal was hardly a surprise after the Mets put up the third-worst team ERA in baseball this season, though Noah Syndergaard was disappointed with the decision. 

“As far as the pitching coach situation, I think it’s pretty much (BS) with Dan. He’s taking the blame for all the injuries we’ve had this year,” Syndergaard told reporters after the Mets’ last game of the year. “I think they are looking in the wrong direction. If Dan’s not back next year, what does that say? Because I am right here saying that in my opinion, I think he is what’s best for our pitching staff and I want him to be my pitching coach for the remainder of my career.”

Terry Collins announced Sunday that he would no longer manage the team and would instead take a front office job. Third base coach Glenn Sherlock, hitting coach Kevin Long and assistant hitting coach Pat Roessler will return next year. Three other staffers—bench coach Dick Scott, first base coach Tom Goodwin and bullpen coach Ricky Bones—have been given permission to seek other jobs in the event the Mets’ new manager does not want to retain them. 

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