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  • The second and third rounds of the 2019 NFL draft are complete, and we have instant analysis and grades for every pick.
By Andy Benoit
April 26, 2019

Three rounds complete, four rounds to go for the 2019 NFL draft. Teams continue to find sleepers and load up on depth through the second and third rounds—how do we grade your team’s picks?

ROUND 2

33. Arizona Cardinals: CB Byron Murphy

For years the Cardinals have tried to make do with a shoddy No. 2 corner—an unfortunate gamble considering that their No. 1 corner, Patrick Peterson, is amongst the handful of cover artists whom offenses specifically try to avoid. At Washington, Murphy was an off-coverage defender, preferring to keep eyes on the backfield and on his receiver. That approach translates well to a zone scheme, but with Patrick Peterson headlining Arizona’s secondary, Murphy will be asked to play a lot of man coverage.

GRADE: B+

34. Indianapolis Colts (via Jets): CB Rock Ya-Sin

Colts defensive coordinator Matt Eberflus believes you cannot draft a corner high if that corner cannot play man-to-man. Fortunately, Ya-Sin did that often and effectively at Temple. He’s more of a mirroring style cover artist than physical press defender, which makes him a nice complement to unsung hero Pierre Desir, who can travel with plus-sized No. 1 receivers. With Kenny Moore in the slot, Indy has three high-level corners, which only helps Ebeflus continue to expand his scheme.

GRADE: A-

35. Jaguars (via Raiders): OT Jawaan Taylor

In today’s NFL, most elite defensive ends rush off the offense’s right side, making right tackles every bit as important as left tackles. Taylor, who will play opposite another high second-rounder in third-year pro Cam Robinson, can hold his own in pass protection, but like many classic right tackles, he is first and foremost a mauling run-blocker. This is excellent value for the old school, run-oriented Jags, whom many thought might take the Florida offensive tackle in Round 1.

GRADE: A

36. San Francisco 49ers: WR Deebo Samuel

Some believe that Samuel will need the aid of schemed tactics like bunch alignments and pre-snap motion to help beat press coverage. Fortunately, Kyle Shanahan’s detailed, pass-friendly system is ripe with those. After drafting Dante Pettis last year, the Niners now have two young receivers to move around the formation, along with star tight end George Kittle and stud receiving backs Tevin Coleman and Jerick McKinnon.

GRADE: B

37. Carolina Panthers (via Seahawks via Giants): OT Greg Little

Little has the size and physical attributes to be a ready-made pass protector in 2019. Scouts like his hand-foot coordination and arm length. Stylistically, that fits the left side, which would suggest that 2017 second-rounder Taylor Moton could move back to the right side. It would also suggest that Daryl Williams, who has been solid but missed essentially all of last season with a knee injury, will not be re-signed when his contract expires after this season.

GRADE: B-

38. Buffalo Bills (via Raiders via Jaguars): G Cody Ford

Longtime Redskin Ty Nsekhe was a nice free-agent signing, but few believed that the career-long swing tackle would assume a new starting job at age 33. Now, Nsekhe provides O-line depth. With Ford, a classic pile-driver whom some see as a guard but the Bills surely see as a right tackle, Buffalo’s offensive line—the AFC’s worst in 2018—has four new members joining incumbent left tackle Dion Dawkins: center Mitch Morse, guards Spencer Long and Quinton Spain and now the rookie from Oklahoma.

GRADE: B+

39. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: CB Sean Bunting

A long corner with press-man and zone abilities is exactly what new defensive coordinator Todd Bowles wanted. (Remember, Bowles was the head coach with the Jets last year when they spent big free agent money on a similarly built specimen, ex-Ram Trumaine Johnson.) Bowles believes in overload blitzing, especially right up the middle where it’s a shorter path to the quarterback. To do this, you must trust your perimeter defenders in solo coverage. With 2018 second-rounder Carlton Davis coming on strong down the stretch after a poor start, the Bucs are solid on both sides. Vernon Hargreaves will move to the slot (a better fit) and M.J. Stewart (also a 2018 second-rounder) becomes a utility backup, if not a contender for a starting safety job. This secondary now has options and depth.

GRADE: A-

40. Oakland Raiders (via Buffalo Bills): CB Trayvon Mullen

The Raiders rotated at every defensive position last year except linebacker. Daryl Worley and Gareon Conley have both teased high-level talent but have yet to consistently deliver on it. Some scouts believe Mullen must improve his route recognition. He’ll be asked to play a lot of matchup zone coverage in Oakland’s scheme.

GRADE: C

41. Denver Broncos: T Dalton Risner

This is as simple as the Broncos addressing their biggest need, as this interior offensive line was in dire straits in 2018. Connor McGovern has struggled too often in one-on-one scenarios at right guard, while left guard Ronald Leary is coming off an Achilles injury and can be cut in 2020 for $8.5M in cap savings. Either of those men could be replaced, except there is also a vacancy at center, with Matt Paradis now in Carolina. Risner can play anywhere; most likely the team will choose to plug him into their weakest spot.

GRADE: B+

42. Denver Broncos (via Cincinnati Bengals): QB Drew Lock

John Elway had a big arm and that’s what he looks for in a QB. Hence the trade for Joe Flacco and now the trade up to get flamethrower Drew Lock. The question is whether Lock can refine his mechanics and decision-making, which is hard to do after joining the NFL. With Flacco aboard, Lock will be given time.

GRADE: C

43. Detroit Lions: LB Jahlani Tavai

Stemming from his Patriots roots, Matt Patricia prefers big, thumping linebackers. He has one in Christian Jones, but Jones is average on the field in a contract year—hence the selection of Tavai. What will be interesting is whether Tavai’s arrival impacts where the explosive but somewhat inconsistent 2017 first-round linebacker Jarrad Davis plays.

GRADE: C+

44. Green Bay Packers: C Elgton Jenkins

Jenkins—who has a nice combination of size, power and length—is probably more of a guard than a center, though he can play both. In Green Bay he will play right guard—the recently signed Billy Turner, who is coming off a stellar season in Miami and just signed for $28M over four years ($9M guaranteed), will play right tackle, where Bryan Bulaga has battled wear and tear and is in a contract year. Don't be surprised if Jenkins learns from the bench initially.

GRADE: B

45. New England Patriots (via Rams via Falcons): CB Joejuan Williams

The Patriots draft a cover corner in the second round almost every year. With J.C. Jackson emerging as a stellar No. 2 opposite All-Pro Stephon Gilmore, they have no immediate need here, especially given that Patrick Chung often mans the slot. It’s too early to dump 2018 second-rounder Duke Dawson and there’s a lot to like about undrafted fourth-year pro Jonathan Jones, who surprisingly moved to safety in the Super Bowl. Bill Belichick must simply love Williams, because the Pats don’t NEED him and may not even have an active roster spot for him on some Sundays this year. The MMQB’s Albert Breer mocked Williams to the Patriots, saying “Bill Belichick is always looking ahead, and he mentioned in his pre-draft press conference the need to match up with bigger receivers and athletic tight ends. The Patriots have had Patrick Chung in that role for a while.” That could be Williams’s role in the future.

GRADE: C

46. Cleveland Browns (via Colts via Redskins): CB Greedy Williams

Denzel Ward is a budding star, but T.J. Carrie and Terrance Mitchell are both up-and-down No. 2/No. 3 corners. To stabilize things and add depth, the Browns tapped a long, speedy playmaker in Williams. Transitional movement can be a bit of an issue with Williams, so he might not be able to match every style of receiver. But Ward typically takes the smaller, quicker guys, and Williams has the body to compete with the bigger guys.

GRADE: B

47. Seattle Seahawks (via Carolina Panthers): S Marquise Blair

Blair is touted for his downhill style and aggression. He won’t have much pressure on him, as Tedric Thompson can man the free safety spot, while the grossly underrated Bradley McDougald can handle strong safety. He played both two-deep and single-high concepts in college.

GRADE: C+

48. New Orleans Saints (via Miami Dolphins): C Erik McCoy

Simple as this: Veteran center Max Unger abruptly retired and the Saints are unwilling to be weak inside. With Drew Brees at QB, the integrity of the interior pocket is as critical as anything. Scouts believe McCoy can assume a starting job right away. He is a crafty technician who has the movement skills to execute man blocks and zone blocks.

GRADE: A

49. Indianapolis Colts (via Cleveland Browns): EDGE Ben Banogu

Banogu adds value to an important position in Indy’s zone-oriented scheme. The team can’t count on getting away with a feeble pass rush again in 2019 like they did for much of ’18. Adding ex-Chief Justin Houston in what’s likely a 30-snaps-a-game role was a good first step, but they still needed this second step, especially since the jury is out on last year’s second-round defensive ends, Kemoko Turay and Tyquan Lewis. Stunts and D-line slants are critical to Indy’s pass rush approach, so Banogu’s success will be largely determined by how well he can move at angles.

GRADE: B

50. Minnesota Vikings: TE Irv Smith Jr.

Kyle Rudolph is a sturdy professional tight end, but with limited twitch and very little speed or quickness, you can’t design much for him. His production comes only within the context of the scheme. The hope is Smith can change that. New offensive coordinator Kevin Stefanski has coached tight ends and will have creative ways to feature the position.

GRADE: B+

51. Tennessee Titans: WR A.J. Brown

With Corey Davis emerging as a featured weapon in Tennessee’s new Rams-style scheme last year and Adam Humphries getting big money to handle the slot, Brown’s arrival gives the Titans a steady all-around puzzle piece to build into their multi-receiver route combinations. It also ensures that speedster Taywan Taylor will play strictly a specialty role, which betters suits him.

GRADE: A-

52. Bengals (via Broncos via Steelers): TE Drew Sample

This pick addresses a position of need for the Bengals, since Tyler Kroft is now a Bill, injury-prone Tyler Eifert is on a one-year contract and C.J. Uzomah is a backup. Sample is perceived as more of a blocker than a receiver, though a team doesn’t take a tight end in Round 2 if it’s not confident that he can do both. In new head coach Zac Taylor’s scheme, Sample’s on-the-move blocking prowess will be key.

GRADE: B-

53. Philadelphia Eagles (via Ravens): RB Miles Sanders

In 2017 Philly had a deep backfield and the NFL’s most expansive ground game. That changed last year, and now we’re seeing the correction. Jordan Howard, an excellent all-around zone runner, was acquired for a conditional sixth round pick that can rise to a fifth. And he’ll eventually take a back seat to Sanders, a smooth, patient three-down back who has the lateral agility to create his own space.

GRADE: A

54. Houston Texans (via Seahawks): CB Lonnie Johnson

Houston’s deficiencies in outside coverage were costly in the playoff loss to Indianapolis. Johnson is a long-bodied raw talent who will often be asked to play to safety help, which sounds liberating but can be challenging depending on the offensive design. If he doesn’t pick things up quickly, he’s still of value, since corners Bradley Roby and Johnathan Joseph are in contract years. Also, Aaron Colvin is under contract for three more years but can be cut for $6.75M savings after next season, which means Houston could lose all three starting corners next offseason.

GRADE: C+

55. Houston Texans: T Max Scharping

From Houston’s side of things, the analysis for first-round pick Tytus Howard can essentially be applied here, with the additional note that the Texans now have an insurance policy at a position of dire need. Both men will make the roster (obviously), the question is how soon can both start?

GRADE: B-

56. Kansas City Chiefs (via Rams via Patriots via Bears): WR Mecole Hardman

And, tacitly, THERE’S the Chiefs’ answer to the Tyreek Hill problem. It’s an important answer because this offense was built predominantly around Hill’s unique talent. It’s unfair to expect any player to provide what Hill provides (provided), but stylistically, Hardman can stretch the field and stress the defense in multiple ways.

GRADE: B

57. Philadelphia Eagles: JJ Arcega-Whiteside

A steady possession target is just the thing for an Eagles offense that found its much-needed speed in free agent signing DeSean Jackson but was looking for receiver depth and a possible replacement for Nelson Agholor, who has long been rumored to be on the trading block (and whose contract expires after this year).

GRADE: B

58. Dallas Cowboys: DT Trysten Hill

The Cowboys emphasize initial quickness off the snap more than almost any team, as it’s key to their gap-penetrating scheme and the slants and stunts that define their four-man rush concepts. Hill is raw but has that good first step. Dallas only needs him to play 20 or so snaps a game, as he’ll fill the spot left by dedicated pot smoker David Irving.

GRADE: C+

59. Indianapolis Colts: WR Parris Campbell

Campbell is a fast, multidimensional playmaker who can be plugged into a gadget role and expand Indy’s offensive designs. If he builds on the route-running improvement that he teased in the pre-draft process, he could be a serviceable starter if Chester Rogers and Devin Funchess hit free agency next year.

GRADE: B+

60. Los Angeles Chargers: S Nasir Adderley

Adderley will predominantly play centerfield in Los Angeles’s single-high, Seahawks-style scheme, allowing bourgeoning superstar Derwin James to play the box. But given Adderly’s potential versatility and James’s unbridled versatility, it could soon be time for the Chargers to expand and diversify that scheme.

GRADE: A-

61. Kansas City Chiefs: S Taylor Rapp

The Rams could be shifting to more dime packages, as they’re thin at inside linebacker and now deep at safety, with the rookie likely to play behind John Johnson and Eric Weddle. Rapp plays faster than he timed in the pre-draft process, and will likely become a versatile piece in a Rams scheme that’s slated to expand in 2019.

GRADE: A-

62. Arizona Cardinals (via Dolphins via Saints): WR Andy Isabella

We don’t know exactly what Kliff Kingsbury’s system will entail in the NFL, but presumably it will feature quick-strike passes. In that case, run-after-catch becomes critical, and shifty players who can create their own space are worth their weight in gold. This is a great value … the only downside is it essentially came at the cost of the QB the team traded up to No. 10 for last year. We’ll do the Cards a favor and grade this pick in a vacuum, not factoring in the Josh Rosen sacrifice.

GRADE: B+

63. Kansas City Chiefs (via Rams): S Juan Thornhill

Expensive new safety Tyrann Mathieu is versatile … which means the Chiefs needed to find another versatile safety—and with Daniel Sorensen being mostly a dime linebacker, Kansas City looked in the draft. Thornhill, like Mathieu, can play both safety spots, as well as slot in nickel and linebacker in dime.

GRADE: A

64. Seattle Seahawks (via New England Patriots): WR D.K. Metcalf

D.K. Metcalf’s lack of route running diversity and refinement caused him to freefall like no receiver in recent draft memory. Fortunately, he landed in a perfect situation. Russell Wilson is a superb deep ball thrower and Metcalf can stretch the field. And Metcalf’s route running is less of an issue given how often Wilson goes off-schedule. Plus, Metcalf’s big body will be valuable on Wilson’s trademark sandlot plays.

GRADE: A+


ROUND 3

65. Arizona Cardinals: DE Zach Allen

Allen is a so-so athlete who has good initial get-off and presses hard through the play, but the Cardinals have a similar guy in ex-Falcon Brooks Reed.

GRADE: C

66. Pittsburgh Steelers (via Raiders): WR Diontae Johnson

Yes, some will say the Steelers essentially traded Antonio Brown for Diontae Johnson and a fifth-rounder. But let’s remember: Johnson is much, much cheaper, and also—presumably—not anywhere near as much of a problem in the locker room. Pittsburgh’s scheme is simple and Ben Roethlisberger is easy to play with. Can Johnson compete right away?

GRADE: B

67. San Francisco 49ers: WR Jalen Hurd

As we covered in the Deebo Samuel write-up, San Francisco’s scheme is receiver-friendly, assuming that receiver has respectable fundamentals. With Hurd, that may take time, as his experience is predominantly at running back. Hurd appears to simply give the Niners depth and options, but given that this team had other needs (namely defensive back), we can assume he wouldn’t be here unless Kyle Shanahan had a specific plan for him.

GRADE: B-

68. New York Jets: EDGE Jachai Polite

Here’s the edge rusher that New York’s roster has been pining for. Some are concerned that Polite isn’t stout enough to hold up against the run, but you can live with your third-rounder becoming just a situation player if those situations involve critical third downs.

GRADE: B-

69. Jacksonville Jaguars: TE Josh Oliver

If you want to be a smashmouth offense, it’s hard to envision where a gadget, flex-style tight end fits in. Oliver did not block at San Jose State…if he comes on the field in any situation other than an obvious passing one, defenses could get a tell.

GRADE: D+

70. Los Angeles Rams (via Buccaneers): RB Darrell Henderson

Henderson is not here to replace Rams star RB Todd Gurley, but he is definitely here to spell him. Gurley’s knee is a long-term concern and his performance fell off drastically last season, so the Rams likely view this as an upgrade at both Henderson’s and Gurley’s spots.

GRADE: A-

71. Denver Broncos: DT Dre’Mont Jones

The Broncos have had success finding quality defensive tackles in the early middle rounds. Scouts love Jones’s one-gapping athleticism.

GRADE: B

72. Cincinnati Bengals: LB Germaine Pratt

Cincy’s linebacking corps is grossly lacking. Though weighing 240, not 250-plus, Pratt has the inside thumping style of play that the team sacrificed in dumping Vontaze Burfict. Don’t be surprised if the rookie plays a big role right away.

GRADE: A-

73. Chicago Bears (via Patriots via Lions): RB David Montgomery

Scouts love Montgomery’s contact balance and tough, physical style. He can be a featured back in Jordan Howard’s old spot, leaving Tarik Cohen in a better-fitting scatback role.

GRADE: A

74. Buffalo Bills: RB Devin Singletary

Picking Singletary suggests the Bills will not retain LeSean McCoy when his deal expires after this season. Like McCoy, Singletary has a renowned jump cut, which can be a valuable trait in the NFL, where so much of the running game comes down to creating your own space within confined areas.

GRADE: B+

75. Green Bay Packers: TE Jace Sternberger

Some see Sternberger as a Travis Kelce-type weapon. That’s not to say the one-year Texas A&M wonder will become an All-Pro, but it does mean the Packers are addressing their need for a receiving tight end after having passed on Iowa’s Noah Fant earlier. In new head coach Matt LaFleur’s scheme, the tight end will be asked to play by himself on the weak side at times. You need athletic receiving prowess to do that.

GRADE: A

76. Washington Redskins: WR Terry McLaurin

It’s not often that a rookie QB enters the NFL with a familiar target, but that’s what McLaurin gives Dwayne Haskins after both played together at Ohio State. Washington does as good as job as almost any team at creating opportunities for receivers through design.

GRADE: B

77. New England Patriots (via Panthers): DE Chase Winovich

He has stellar physical traits, and his effort and fundamentals (which can be honed) fit well in a Patriots scheme that emphasizes setting the edge and finishing pass rushers late in the down.

GRADE: A-

78. Miami Dolphins: G Michael Deiter

Deiter started all four years at Wisconsin (after redshirting) and should start in Year One with the Dolphins, who had iffy backups Chris Reed and Isaac Asiata penciled in at left guard. Deiter is a strong, nasty competitor who also has versatility.

GRADE: A+

79. Los Angeles Rams (via Falcons): CB David Long

The Rams have said they want to sign Marcus Peters, who’s in the final year of his deal, to a long-term contract, but could drafting Long mean the end is near for Aqib Talib, whose contract expires after this season? Some see Long as a slot corner, but his physical press-man style might translate effectively to the outside.

GRADE: B-

80. Cleveland Browns: LB Sione Takitaki

Takitaki was considered a boom-or-bust performer at BYU. Assuming the Browns will re-up productive middle linebacker Joe Schobert when his contract expires after 2019, this pick could have been made with special teams primarily in mind.

GRADE: C-

81. Detroit Lions (via Vikings): S Will Harris

The Lions play a lot of six-and seven-DB packages under Matt Patricia, making secondary depth and versatility a key component for this defense. Anyone in this scheme must have the ability to match up one-on-one in space, and the Lions hope Harris can do that, particularly against tight ends.

GRADE: B-

82. Tennessee Titans: G Nate Davis

With right guard Kevin Pamphile in a contract year, the hope is Davis can assume that starting job in 2020. He’s known as a mauler, which is interesting because the Titans employ an outside zone scheme, which is built more on agility.

GRADE: C+

83. Pittsburgh Steelers: CB Justin Layne

Layne is perceived as a plus-sized bump-and-run corner, which the Steelers need after finally admitting (albeit tacitly) that Artie Burns has been a bust. Pittsburgh runs a zone scheme, but their outside corners are often required to matchup to receivers vertically. With ex-Chief Steven Nelson aboard, Layne has time to develop from an initially lesser role.

GRADE: B+

84. Kansas City Chiefs (via Seahawks): DT Khalen Saunders

Kansas City’s run defense has been perplexingly poor over the years. A change in scheme (from Bob Sutton and his 3-4 to Steve Spagnuolo and his 4-3) will help, but so will adding new bodies up front. Scouts like Saunders’s suddenness.

GRADE: B

85. Baltimore Ravens: DE Jaylon Ferguson

Many saw Ferguson as a higher-level prospect, but he didn’t test well prior to the draft. His film, however, showed good hand usage and a productive speed-to-power rush. The Ravens need a replacement for Za’Darius Smith and might need another next year for Matt Judon, who is slated for free agency. 2017 second day picks Tyus Bowser and Tim Williams have not developed, so the Ravens are trying again.

GRADE: A-

86. Houston Texans: TE Kahale Warring

Warring is a freakish, high-upside, under-the-radar prospect for a Texans team that drafted two tight ends last year—Jordan Akins and Jordan Thomas—and found distinct roles for both of them. With Ryan Griffin in a contract year, the team appears to be looking for insurance and long-term options.

GRADE: C-

87. Chicago Bears: RB Damien Harris

This one is a little surprising, as Harris figures to be more of a first- and second-down back, which is precisely what last year’s first-round pick, Sony Michel, is for this team. James White and Rex Burkhead are also under contract to 2021. Still, Harris is a productive player from a storied program, so you can’t outright rip the decision.

GRADE: C

88. Seattle Seahawks (via Vikings via Lions via Eagles): LB Cody Barton

In Seattle’s scheme, linebackers must have the speed to drop deeper into coverage and then quickly converge on the ball after the catch. Some question whether Barton climbs high enough on those charts, but with Bobby Wagner and K.J. Wright still going strong, Seattle need only find a No. 3 linebacker to play 12-16 snaps a game.

GRADE: C

89. Indianapolis Colts: LB Bobby Okereke

Behind Darius Leonard and Anthony Walker, the Colts struggled at No. 3 linebacker spot, which was often manned by Matthew Adams. Opponents at times went with two tight ends so they could deliberately attack Adams in coverage. Some might question whether Okereke, at 240 pounds, is stout enough to be a No. 3 base linebacker, but in Indy’s scheme, quickness is most critical in that position.

GRADE: B

90. Dallas Cowboys: G Connor McGovern

Last year’s supposed second-round steal Connor Williams struggled to anchor and maintain pass blocks as a rookie, and he might not have the girth to prosper in the NFL. McGovern provides some long-term insurance here. Plus, if La’el Collins is not re-signed in 2020, that could necessitate Williams moving to right tackle, opening a spot at guard.

GRADE: B+

91. Los Angeles Chargers: T Trey Pipkins

Russell Okung and Sam Tevi are solid bookend tackles under contract for the next two years, and Pipkins is viewed as a developmental prospect here.

GRADE: A-

92. New York Jets (via Vikings via Seahawks via Chiefs): T Chuma Edoga

Edoga was a highly touted prospect who did not always play up to his abilities at USC. The Jets appear to be rolling the dice, hoping to find a developmental project who could sneak into a starting role down the road. It’s worth noting that their top three offensive tackles, Kelvin Beachum, Brandon Shell and backup Brent Qvale are all in the final year of their contracts.

GRADE: B+

93. Baltimore Ravens (via Vikings via Jets via Saints): WR Miles Boykin

Yes, drafting Marquise Brown in the first round takes some of the sting off Baltimore’s dire need at wide receiver, but entering Friday night, it was still a position of need. Boykin is viewed more as a developmental project. Do they believe he can contribute immediately in a No. 4 role?

GRADE: C+

94. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (via Rams): CB Jamel Dean

That’s two corners drafted in one night for the Buccaneers, which makes you wonder how the new coaching staff views 2016 first-round pick Vernon Hargreaves.

GRADE: C+

95. New York Giants (via Patriots via Browns): DE Oshane Ximines

Giants fans might be decrying the failure to get an edge rusher earlier, but defensive coordinator James Bettcher’s blitz-intensive system puts more emphasis on players winning in solo coverage than off the edge. The hope is that Ximines can follow through.

GRADE: B

96. Buffalo Bills (via Redskins): TE Dawson Knox

The Bills are not deep at wide receiver and they need to simplify their system for young QB Josh Allen. A great solution is to go with multiple tight ends, which puts the defense in more predictable looks and gives you more dimension in the running game.

GRADE: A-

97. Los Angeles Rams (via Patriots): T Bobby Evans

With long arms, Evans is built like a true offensive tackle. That’s not to say he can’t play guard—but if he is indeed a tackle, it likely means the Rams plan on moving their presumed tackle of the future, 2018 third-round pick Joe Noteboom, inside. Something to keep an eye on.

GRADE: B

98. Jacksonville Jaguars (via Rams): LB Quincy Williams

With the Jags being two-deep at every linebacker spot and set for the long-term in nickel with Telvin Smith and Myles Jack, this draft pick appears to be about bolstering special teams.

GRADE: C-

99. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (via Rams): S Mike Edwards

Edwards was a versatile four-year starter in the SEC. Now he joins a Bucs scheme that places a premium on safety versatility, with Todd Bowles at defensive coordinator. The new staff is not tied to any of the incumbent safeties, and none of those incumbent safeties—save for maybe Justin Evans—are clear starters. Could Edwards become a first-unit player? 

GRADE: A

100. Carolina Panthers: QB Will Grier

And so it turns out that the dark horse QB in this draft wasn’t a dark horse at all, just another projected long-term backup. Given Cam Newton’s shoulder problems, backup QB might prove to be a critical position in Carolina.

GRADE: B+

101. New England Patriots (via Rams via Patriots): T Yodny Cajuste

With no proven backup tackles on the roster, the Patriots decided they’d develop one. Cajuste is a project, but offensive line coach Dante Scarnechia, at this point, is viewed as a wizard.

GRADE: C+

102. Minnesota Vikings (via Ravens): RB Alexander Mattison

Mattison’s determined, urgent running style fits a team that wants to be run-oriented. He certainly won’t challenge Dalvin Cook for significant playing time, but he could spell Cook in certain run-oriented packages.

GRADE: B

Question or comment? Email us at talkback@themmqb.com.

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