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What Dolphins History Tells Us to Expect from Hill in 2022

Tyreek Hill became the 10th Pro Bowl wide receiver the Miami Dolphins acquired during an offseason

The Miami Dolphins' headline-making acquisition of Tyreek Hill wasn't the first time they brought in a marquee wide receiver in the offseason.

The Dolphins previously swung big with high-profile receivers like eventual Hall of Famer Paul Warfield, former first overall pick Irving Fryar, along with Mike Wallace and Brandon Marshall.

In all, the Dolphins now have acquired 10 former Pro Bowl wide receivers in the offseason by our research, and the previous results suggest it's reasonable to expect a good 2022 season from Hill though possibly not quite what he did last year.

Of the previous nine, six ended up being starters for the Dolphins but five saw their touchdown total drop in their first season with Miami and four saw their reception total drop. On the flip side, four saw their average per reception increase.

Hill joined the Dolphins after making the Pro Bowl in each of his first six NFL seasons and finishing the 2021 season with 159 targets, 111 catches, 1239 yards (11.2 average) and nine touchdowns.

Here's the look back at those nine former Pro Bowl wide receivers who joined the Dolphins during the offseason.

Paul Warfield, 1970

How acquired: Trade with Cleveland for a 1970 first-round pick

Season before Miami: 14 games, 14 starts, 42 catches, 886 yards, 21.1 avg., 10 TDs, Pro Bowl selection

First year with Miami: 11 games, 11 starts, 28 catches, 703 yards, 25.1 avg., 6 TDs, Pro Bowl selection

Breakdown: That he ended up being elected to the Hall of Fame tells you all you need to know about Warfield, as good a deep threat as there was in the NFL in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Marlin Briscoe, 1972

How acquired: Trade with Buffalo for a 1973 first-round pick

Season before Miami: 14 games, 14 starts, 44 catches, 603 yards, 13.7 avg., 5 TDs

First year with Miami: 10 games, 3 starts, 16 catches, 279 yards, 17.4 avg., 4 TDs

Breakdown: Briscoe was almost a luxury on an offense dominated by the running game, not to mention the presence of Warfield.

Irving Fryar, 1993

How acquired: Trade with New England for a 1993 second-round pick and a 1994 third-round pick

Season before Miami: 15 games, 14 starts, 106, targets, 55 catches, 791 yards, 14.4 avg., 4 TDs

First year with Miami: 16 games, 16 starts, 118 targets, 64 catches, 1010 yards, 15.8 avg., 5 TDs, Pro Bowl selection

Breakdown: Despite having made the Pro Bowl, Fryar didn't quite live up to his draft status in New England, but he was terrific in his three seasons as Dan Marino's main target.

Gary Clark, 1995

How acquired: Signed as an unrestricted free agent from Arizona

Season before Miami: 15 games, 2 starts, 103 targets, 50 catches, 771 yards, 15.4 avg., 1 TD

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First year with Miami: 16 games, 0 starts, 64 targets, 37 catches, 525 yards, 14.2 avg., 2 TDs

Breakdown: Clark, who had helped Washington win a couple of Super Bowls (1987, 1991 seasons), was at the end of his career by the time he joined the Dolphins but still played a nice complementary role in his one season with the Dolphins.

Ricky Sanders, 1995

How acquired: Signed as a free agent

Season before Miami: 14 games, 12 starts, 103 targets, 67 catches, 599 yards, 8.9 avg., 1 TD

First year with Miami: 0 games released in October

Breakdown: Clark's former Washington teammate, Sanders was inactive for each of the first five games before the Dolphins released him. He went on to close out his NFL career with three games with the Falcons that season.

David Boston, 2004

How acquired: Trade with San Diego for a 2005 conditional sixth-round pick and CB Jamar Fletcher

Season before Miami: 14 games, 14 starts, 115 targets, 70 catches, 880 yards, 12.6 avg., 7 TDs

First year with Miami: Whole season on IR

Breakdown: The eighth overall pick in the 1999 draft, Boston had two huge seasons with Arizona before his body started to break down. His career ended after he played five games for Miami in 2005.

Marty Booker, 2004

How acquired: Trade with Chicago for DE Adewale Ogunleye (Dolphins also got a 2004 third-round pick)

Season before Miami: 13 games, 13 starts, 105 targets, 52 catches, 715 yards, 13.8 avg., 4 TDs

First year with Miami: 15 games, 15 starts, 105 targets, 50 catches, 638 yards, 12.8 avg., 1 TDs

Breakdown: This trade actually was made in August when it became apparent the Dolphins were getting nowhere in their contract talks with Ogunleye. Booker was a solid complementary wide receiver, but the Dolphins offense was a mess in 2004 and he wasn't able to help much.

Brandon Marshall, 2010

How acquired: Trade with Denver for a 2010 second-round pick and a 2011 second-round pick

Season before Miami: 15 games, 13 starts, 154 targets, 101 catches, 1120 yards, 11.1 avg., 10 TDs, Pro Bowl selection

First year with Miami: 14 games, 14 starts, 146 targets, 86 catches, 1014 yards, 11.8 avg., 3 TDs

Breakdown: Marshall was very productive in his two seasons with the Dolphins in terms of catches, but the touchdowns weren't there and he wasn't the easiest teammate, as evidenced by the fact that a player of his ability ended up with six teams in 13 seasons (and made the Pro Bowl with four of them, including the Dolphins in 2011).

Mike Wallace, 2013

How acquired: Signed as an unrestricted free agent from Pittsburgh

Season before Miami: 15 games, 14 starts, 119 targets, 64 catches, 836 yards, 13.1 avg., 8 TDs

First year with Miami: 16 games, 16 starts, 141 targets, 73 catches, 930 yards, 12.7 avg., 5 TDs

Breakdown: The Dolphins sure tried getting Wallace the ball after signing him in 2013 and Wallace got himself open deep way more often than his stats might suggest. Like Marshall, Wallace wore out his welcome after two seasons and was traded to Minnesota.